Thoughts from Day One of Long Island-NYC Emergency Management Conference

I attended the Long Island – New York City Emergency Management ConferenceDay One – today.  Here’s a few thoughts I wanted to pass on that are relavent to Living Prepared™:

  • There was lots of discussion about hurricanes…. almost none on H1N1 or pandemics.  The agenda was set months ago before the H1N1 outbreak… Still… it would have been good to hear about the State’s, City’s and neighboring counties plans given the current response to H1N1…..
  • Speaking of hurricane season:  NYC is third largest port in country.  How shipping is affected may be an underestimated impact of a category 3 or 4 storm.  Long Island plans call for ordered evacuations; the NYC plan does not and calls for sheltering in public facilities; the result will be Long Island residents will fill up shelters in NYC – especially in Queens which borders Nassau county.  This needs some more thinking.
  • Debris removal – federal guidelines have changed making it more difficult to use public funds for debris removal on private property.  Must be proven cost-effective to do it or some such nonsense.  This also needs some more thinking.
  • Bryan Norcross – famous for his on air coverage of Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and author of the Hurricane Almanac, was the luncheon speaker.  He noted that the US has lots of disasters – the East Coast has hurricanes (being on the west ocean basin); the middle of the country has the perfect geography for tornadoes; and the West Coast has its Pacific Rim earthquakes/volcanoes.  So the challenge for government is who is going to lead people through these disaster events?  He sees a failure in emergency communications planning nationally because there is no national broadcast system.  (I’m not sure I agree – more on that in a moment).  He cited a gap between what the National Hurricane Center knows about the impacts of hurricanes (almost everything) and what the people impacted by hurricanes say afterwards (“gee, I wasn’t expecting that”).  The Emergency Alert System (EAS) seems pretty effective (it allows government to break into all TV and radio broadcasts to issue alerts – NYC in particular does a great job of managing this and other assets to notify the public during emergencies.  Media coverage I’ve seen of large pending storms seems pretty good.  I don’t think you can blame government for people’s attention spans.  However, his advocacy of setting up internet feeds and streaming from City/State/County EOCs (Emergency Operations Centers) such that the public and the media can be given live info directly from government during emergencies is an excellent one and something to take note of.
  • NOAA Weather radios – get one.  They turn on automatically when emergency alerts are sent and while the system was set up for weather, it could be used for other disasters/emergencies by government.  (Reminder to self – more on this in a future post.)
  • CMAS – Cellular Mass Alerting System – awaiting federal action – will provide cell alerting based on proximity to cell towers.  Finally!
  • NY-Alert is one of the best uses of the internet to notify people of emergencies.  They are also soon pioneering a lot of web 2.0 applications – including the ability to send notifications all the way into people’s XBoxes and Wii’s.   Pretty cool.  The City of New York’s Office of Emergency Management is also going to be using twitter and facebook to push out alerts and public information.  They launch Notify NYC (a text based emergency alert system) on a citywide basis tomorrow.  If you are a resident, sign up to be notified of events/incidents in your neighborhood.

More to come tomorrow from Day Two.

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One Response

  1. I absolutely love your blog. Thank you for sharing all this information.

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